Guardian: Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems

So much here to unpack.

We can’t fight something faceless and nameless. We can’t see what we can’t see. When the problem is everything, how do you get outside of ‘everything’? The first fish turns to the second fish and says, What is water? If the ‘solution’ causes the problem, then more of the ‘solution’ will only lead to more of the problem. I say freedom, you hear freedom.

‘Inequality is recast as virtuous … The market ensures that everyone gets what they deserve … The rich persuade themselves that they acquired their wealth through merit … The poor begin to blame themselves for their failures, even when they can do little to change their circumstances.’

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/apr/15/neoliberalism-ideology-problem-george-monbiot?CMP=fb_gu

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Guardian: Let’s wrench back power from the billionaires

Yes, but what can we actually do? Can anyone give me a roadmap for change? It doesn’t feel like ‘consume less, care more’ is enough anymore.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/14/power-billionaires-bernie-sanders-poverty-life-expectancy-climate-change

Guardian: “Fat Cat Thursday”

Unacceptable.

“Bosses of top British companies will have made more money by lunchtime on Thursday than the average UK worker will earn in the entire year… The chief executives of FTSE 100 companies are paid a median average of £3.45m a year, which works out at 120 times the £28,758 collected by full-time UK workers on average… The title for the highest paid listed company boss this year is almost certain to be Jeff Fairburn, the chief executive of housebuilder Persimmon, who is on track to collect a £110m bonus.”

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/jan/04/fat-cat-thursday-top-bosses-earn-workers-annual-salary-by-lunchtime

Guardian: What should equality really look like?

The political right have so successfully sold their system of “equality of opportunity”, of “meritocracy” and “social mobility” to the masses that not only do we not realise that this neoliberal dream obfuscates the truth of increasing inequality, even more effectively, we don’t want to realise this, because then we would be without the reality and the hope, however illusory.

To bring change, we have to want change.

“A more equal society would mean everyone has shelter, healthcare, education, food and time to rest and play as well as work. It would mean not discriminating on grounds of identity, sex or skin colour. It would mean a system of “public luxury and private sufficiency”: of facilities such as libraries and galleries and parks which could be participated in by everyone. It would involve foregrounding egalitarian goals and dramatically curbing corporate power and high pay. It would mean heeding the call for universal public services. It would mean prioritising climate change as an issue that affects everyone.”

https://www.theguardian.com/inequality/2018/jan/04/inequality-is-under-attack-but-what-should-equality-really-look-like

The Guardian: It’s not just the 1%.

It’s a zero sum game: there are only so many good jobs, so many good schools, so many good neighbourhoods. If the poor are to be allowed their fair share, the rich must give up some of what they have. On the level of the individual, it makes sense to want the best for your children. But collectively, it can only lead to inequality. We must change our thinking about the worth or a person.

-BeLessHuman

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jun/08/dream-hoarders-1-percent-upper-middle-class

Notes on America from James Baldwin’s Nobody Knows My Name

Insights from over 50 years ago cut even deeper today for the fact that we have learnt absolutely nothing.

On anti-intellectualism and the myth of America:
[W]e [as Americans] have a very deep-seated distrust of real intellectual effort (probably because we suspect that it will destroy, as I hope it does, that myth of America to which we cling so desperately).

On racism and poverty:
Now I am perfectly aware that there are other slums in which white men are fighting for their lives, and mainly losing. I know that blood is also flowing through those streets and that the human damage there is incalculable. People are continually pointing out to me the wretchedness of white people in order to console me for the wretchedness of blacks. But an itemized account of the American failure does not console me and it should not console anyone else.

On the American dream:
The people, however, who believe that this democratic anguish has some consoling value are always pointing out that So-and-So, white, and So-and-So, black rose from the slums into the big time. The existence–the public existence–of, say, Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis, Jr. proves to them that America is still the land of opportunity and that inequalities vanish before the determined will. It proves nothing of the sort … and the inequalities suffered by the many are in no way justified by the rise of a few. … Furthermore, the American equation of success with the big time reveals an awful disrespect for human life and human achievement. This equation has placed our cities among the most dangerous in the world and has placed our youth among the most empty and most bewildered. The situation of our youth is not mysterious. Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them. They must, they have no other models. That is exactly what our children are doing. They are imitating our immorality, our disrespect for the pain of others.

On justifying our crimes:
The world has never lacked for horrifying examples [even if Birmingham is worse, no doubt Johannesburg, South Africa, beats it by several miles, and Buchenwald was one of the worst things that ever happened in the entire history of the world]; but I do not believe that these examples are meant to be used as justification for our own crimes. This perpetual justification empties the heart of all human feeling. The emptier our hearts become, the greater will be our crimes.

More on the myth of America:
This illusion owes everything to the great American illusion that our state is a state to be envied by other people: we are powerful, and we are rich. But our power makes us uncomfortable and we handle it very ineptly. … If we ourselves were not so fond of this illusion, we might understand ourselves and other peoples better than we do, and be enabled to help them understand us. I am very often tempted to believe that this illusion is all that is left of the great dream that was to have become America; whether this is so or not, this illusion certainly prevents us from making America what we say we want it to be.

On education:
It is hard enough, God knows, under the best of circumstances, to get an education in this country. White children are graduated yearly who can neither read, write, nor think, and who are in a state of the most abysmal ignorance concerning the world around them. But at least they are white. They are under the illusion–which, since they are so badly educated, sometimes has a fatal tenacity–that they can do whatever they want to do. Perhaps that is exactly what they are doing, in which case we had best all go down in prayer.

On false nostalgia:
I am afraid that most of the white people I have ever known impressed me as being in the grip of a weird nostalgia, dreaming of a vanished state of security and order, against which dream, unfailingly and unconsciously, they tested and very often lost their lives.

 

Quotes from Nobody Knows My Name by James Baldwin, collected on irepeatinmysleep.wordpress.com.